Places to visit in Gyaraspur
    
                   
41 km north-east of Sanchi, Gyraspur was a place of considerable importance in the medieval period. Here, in the ruins called Athakhambe (eight pillars) and Chaukhambe (four pillars) are what remains of the columned halls of two temples belonging to the 9th and 10th centuries AD. The faceted shafts of Athakhambe with their extreme delicacy of carving testify to the high degree of craftsmanship during the period. Other monuments of note at Gyraspur are of the early 10th century: Bajra Math and Mala Devi Temple, the latter distinguished by its carved pillars with foliated motifs, representatives of the richest post-Gupta style. The town's name is derived from the big fair which used to be held here in the 11th month, sometimes known as Gyaras.
  
           
Tehsil of Vidisha District, Gyaraspur lies in a gorge of some low steep hills, at distance of about 38.4 km. from the district and Tehsil headquarters town to its north-east. The place is situated on the old high road to Sagar. Buses ply on the road. The extensive ruins, scattered in and around the Tehsil, narrate the story of glory that was Gyaraspur in the late ancient and early mediaeval times. These ruins indicate that the place has passed through the influence of Buddhism, Brahmanism and Jainism.
 
Maladevi Temple
      
 
LOCATION:  Gyaraspur tehsil.
  
Historical Importance :-
   
            This temple is quite picturesquely situated on the slope of a hill overlooking the valley.Located on a huge platform cut out of the hillside and strengthened by a massive retaining wall, Maladevi temple is in fact imposing and stupendous building. It comprise an entrance-porch, a hall and a shrine surrounded by a circumambulatory passage and crowned with a lofty Shikara all covered with rich carving. Though now jain images occupy the shrine room and hall, a figure of a goddess occupying the dedicatory block on the outer door frame and other decorative sculptures probably indicate that the temple was originally dedicated to some goddess and it was subsequently appropriated by the Jains.
 
Hindola Torana
      
  LOCATION:  Gyaraspur tehsil.
  
Historical Importance :-
   
             It is one of the 'Toranas' or ornamental entrance arches leading to a large temple either of Vishnu or of Trimurti. Hindola means a swing, and this tarana with its two upright pillars and cross-beam has a truly connotative name. All the four sides of the two lofty pillars are carved into panels with insets of the ten incarnations of Vishnu.
 
Bajramath Temple
      
 
LOCATION:  Gyaraspur tehsil.
  
Historical Importance :-
   
            
The bajramath is a fine example of a very rare class of temples with three shrines or cells placed abreast. All these shrines now occupied by Jain idols belonging to the Digambara sect. But it is clear from the sculptures placed on the door frames and niches on the basement that originally these shrines sheltered the Hindu Trinity. More precisely the central shrine was dedicated to Surya, the southern to Vishnu and the nothern to Siva. The carving of the doorway is exceptionally fine and vigorous. The Shikara of the temple is unusual in its plan and design.
 
Shalbhanjika
      
Shalbhanjika
  
  LOCATION:  Gyaraspur tehsil.
  
Historical Importance :-
   
             A rare sculpture has been found at Gyaraspur.It is an exquisite stone figure of a Vrishaka (wood nymph) belonging to a period between the 8th & 9th century A.D. and kept in the archaeological museum,Gwalior.It has been brought there from Gyaraspur. This matchless oriental beauty represents a SHALBHANJIKA.The sculptured figure stands in a tribhang posture formed by bending her beautiful body in triple tortion and triple flexion while her face is alive with an intense expression, rather an unusual and rare phenomenon.Some smaller figures in similar pose are depicted on the sides of the 'HINDOLA TORAN' (gateway).